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In this episode Joel and Antonia talk about having a healthy relationship with both marketing and money.

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Showing 6 comments
  • Chelsea Welch
    Reply

    A very interesting experience is to simultaneously feel shame over making money (i.e. having thoughts such as “I get paid way too much.”) and also have animosity toward people who make a lot of money (i.e. having thoughts such as “that person must be an arrogant, selfish jerk.”) So it’s a confusing internal dynamic that I’m wrestling with right now as I work to change my relationship with money, but I am certainly trying very hard to do so. I’m realizing that I can’t let go of shame over having money myself without discontinuing my hate of others who make money, and vice versa. Both changes in paradigm have to happen at the same time.

    We are constantly bombarded by messages of “you don’t need money to be happy.” I would like to call BS on that statement. I think there have been some recent studies that have shown that happiness does increase with an increase in income (up to a certain point, but of course that makes sense – by the time you get to the point where you have money you are not utilizing (after you have sufficient savings), additional money isn’t going to make you feel safer). But, like many people, I know what it’s like to live without enough income and it’s extremely unpleasant and stressful. Not only that, but having extra money for “spending” allows us to invest in what we think is valuable. For me, that’s personal growth, healing work, taking care of my body, etc – like many people in this community. Without those things, I would feel utterly lost.

    It’s such a strange push-pull dynamic. We want money and we don’t. Feel desire for it yet also shame over it. We admire people who are successful yet demonize them when they make “too much”. I’m glad you made this podcast as I think that we all struggle with it to varying degrees. Awareness is the first step, now we just have to work on changing our perspectives one step at a time 😉

  • Charlene
    Reply

    Great show! Money became fiat in the 70’s, not the 20’s, btw.

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      You are correct. Richard Nixon decoupled the US dollar to gold in 1971.

      In 1933 FDR signed executive order 6102 forbidding people to hoard gold/silver. Going back to the crash of 1929 – it seemed like Fiat money was inevitable.

      Thanks for the clarity. 🙂

  • A listener
    Reply

    In a world of haves and have nots, of course there is, and should be, shame on those who earn too much money

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      Why won’t you put your name on this comment? Why hide in the shadows of anonymous criticism?

      For me, this line of thinking is problematic.

      Who gets to decide how “too much money” is defined? You? The billionaires? Congress? The EU? This needs to be clear who gets to make these decisions.

      Why “shame” for wanting to do better and gain more resource? That seems counter to ethos of life affirmation.

      Does this worldview take into account that humans don’t measure things in absolute wealth? (For example – humans measure ourselves in relative wealth to others.)

      Would your logic also apply universally? Would you say that in a world of healthy and less-healthy – those that are healthy and have a desire to become more healthy should feel shame around that?

      Or should they only feel shame if they prevent others from becoming healthy?

      Thanks for the comment. And don’t be afraid to bring your real self to the conversation.

  • Amy Francis
    Reply

    I like the idea of re-framing money as social value. As a writer by trade, I am aware that my profession has lost perceived value in some contexts but is gaining perceived need in others, and marketing my services is a major factor to my financial success as a freelancer.

    Another observation: I have always struggled to expand my vision beyond making just enough money to be comfortable, mainly because I have a self-centred perspective on wealth (i.e. it’s about how much I need, not what I could do for others with the extra resources).

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