Podcast – Episode 0313 – Honoring Personal Thought Leaders

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In this episode, Joel and Antonia reflect on the death and legacy of Neil Peart (drummer for the progressive rock band Rush) and how thought leaders shape how we think as people.

In this podcast you’ll find:

  • Neil Peart died January 7, 2020, at the age of 67 of brain cancer
  • He was the drummer and lyricist for Rush and an author of multiple books.
  • Our guess for Neil Peart’s best fit type is INTP.
  • His lyrics and music were very intuitive and geeky.
  • Dave Grohl was a huge Neil Peart fan.
  • The song Limelight dealt with what it means to be a celebrity.
  • Limelight: “I can’t pretend this stranger is a long-awaited friend.”
  • You can’t pretend a fan is a long-awaited friend.
  • Dormant messages
  • Rush is an acquired taste. They were very progressive for their time.
  • You have to get used to the singer’s voice.
  • Red Barchetta: a post-apocalyptic song where driving is outlawed.
  • Sometimes we don’t know how someone’s expression of art is going to affect us.
  • Marathon is a song about what it takes to make something big happen. It is a lifelong commitment: a marathon.
  • Occasionally, you can take a breather, but you gotta get back on the road because nobody gets a free ride. Stay on purpose.
  • Mission is a song from Neil Peart. It’s a love letter to those who inspired him:
    • It’s cold comfort
    • To the ones without it
    • To know how they struggled
    • How they suffered about it
    • If their lives were
    • Exotic and strange
    • They would likely have
    • Gladly exchanged them
    • For something a little more plain
    • Maybe something a little more sane
    • We each pay a fabulous price
    • For our visions of paradise
    • But a spirit with a vision
    • Is a dream with a mission
  • Anybody who wants to make an impact in the world gives up so much to make it happen.
  • These people sacrifice a normal life to follow their mission.
  • People on mission may feel lonely because of what they have sacrificed.
  • There is so much safety and familiarity in a templatized life.
  • What are we allowing in now that is going to sit dormant and impact us in the future?
  • Good messaging or disempowering messaging?
  • Steve Jobs never took short cuts. He soldered straight lines that nobody would see.
  • TJs and FPs like to model how others go about things.
  • TPs and FJs like to model how things are said. They value the importance of good word choices and grammar.
  • Mentors are very important.
  • Apocryphal story: Dark wolf and a light wolf. The one you feed will win.
  • The part of us we want to be the biggest influence over who we are is the part we need to feed.
  • Mentors, thought leaders, and artists are crafting us to be better human beings.
  • When we find somebody who has highly calibrated thought, there isn’t anything wrong with following them and recognizing how much they have impacted us.
  • We can be those people for others, too.
  • There is a hostile zeitgeist in the world today.
  • How are you feeding into it?
  • Are you contributing to the hostility?
  • Neil Peart put a massive amount of time and attention into the songs he released.
  • How much care do we take with the messages we send out on social media?
  • Recognize how careful thought and influence can do a lot of good.
  • Evaluate what you say before sending it.
  • Introverted Feeling likes to model other people’s lives.
  • We can be a force for good if we pause and think things through.
  • There is so much content in the world.
  • Talking for its own sake, has become a lot of noise. 
  • Most people don’t have much to say. They are just repeating what they have heard. 
  • Real thought leaders have something useful to say.
  • Instead of arguing at the social media level, what can you create at the top level? 
  • Great creators think at the top level. 
  • They express and create.

 

 

 In this episode Joel and Antonia reflect on the death and legacy of Neil Peart (drummer for the progressive rock band Rush) and how thought leaders shape how we think as people. #rush #neilpeart

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Showing 5 comments
  • Arabella
    Reply

    My own personal thought leader – or rather embodiment leader – is my paternal grandmother, probably an ESFP (I’m an INFP). She lived a hard life in the poorest part in London and survived two World Wars (lost her fiancé in WWI), had eight children (a few of whom died at a young age), lost her husband after he broke his back in an industrial accident and was herself crippled by arthritis and spent all the time I knew her in a wheelchair (she lived with us until her death when I was 13). But she had a great, earthy sense of humour, was generous and never was afraid to speak her mind, and I never really heard her complain until the end. She’s who always comes to mind when life gets tough and I hear her voice telling me to ”keep on going, girl”. If there’s anyone I want to embody in my life, it’s her.

  • Beth
    Reply

    Less is more…boom! Thank you for sharing your vulnerability over Neil’s passing, Antonia. It was not dumb, so many of us have shed tears. He truly was a treasure and the fact that we can celebrate his impact is a blessing.

  • Pete Abramenko
    Reply

    RUSH—“Closer to the Heart”: “And the men who hold high places must be the ones who start…mold a new reality—closer to the heart…”

    Thank you for the podcast Antonia. I first saw RUSH in concert in 1977 at the age of 16 in Manhattan and was already captivated by Neil Peart’s metaphysical lyrics…

    Thank goodness they made the RUSH documentary a few years ago… For anyone who hasn’t seen it, it’s available on Netflix and even people who are not rush fans will find it fascinating.

    I’m forwarding the podcast to my friends who are fellow RUSH fans….

  • Danielle
    Reply

    Music is a phenomenal medium for expression. For me, there’s not so much as bands that have influenced me, but individual songs. One song that always comes bask for me is My Chemical Romance’s “Welcome to the Black Parade.”

    This was a song I had heard relatively often since about the time it came out. I was quite young then, and I can’t say I really “got” the song until quite some time later. I was never really into the whole subculture that surrounded bands like MCR, so that might be why it took so long to click in my head. I don’t really know why this song has struck a deep chord with me, but I think it’s the lyrics “And though you’re dead and gone believe me, your memory will carry on.” Every time I either experience loss or see loss in the world, those words echo back to me.

    The dead live on through our memories. I often find myself telling a really entertaining, borderline ridiculous story from my teenage years that involves an acquaintance who passed away when we were about 19. It’s one of those stories that’s really only funny in hindsight, mainly because of how I reacted and how I actually figured out what the problem was by jokingly saying “Hey at least this isn’t happening,” and I accidentally hit the nail on the head. So, my former classmate lives on through that memory and that story.

    On the flip side, there’s my long-standing “Screw everything” anthem, which is Green Day’s American Idiot. Every time something phenomenally dumb or ridiculous seems to happen in the US, I just blast that song. Weirdly, it helps me stay positive about the world because I can let the negative “Oh my god I’m surrounded by idiots who are launching society off a metaphorical cliff” vibes out in a convenient time frame.

    Art is so important for its messages. I’m not too big into Rush, but my Dad has been a fan of their music since the 1970s. I went with him to see them in concert about a decade ago. It’s sad that the world has lost a phenomenal talent in Neil Peart. But, he’ll always live on through the music he created. This circles back to my point about “The Black Parade.” “And although your dead and gone, believe me, your memory will carry on.”

    Also, as an ENFP, I resonate with Joel’s point about wanting to monitor the type of messaging that comes into your ears. I will sometimes genuinely enjoy satire, and I keep up with the news. However, when political commentators start letting pure anger infest their messages, I have to turn it off. My mind just is completely repelled with it. There are instances where it’s justifiable to be outraged since there are truly bad things that happen. But, I usually find angry commentary unwarranted. I guess there’s a market for it because I keep encountering it, but it makes me cringe and I know I have to stay away from it or I’ll get super negative and start seeing the apocalypse everywhere. And that will set me back on a really important part of my personal growth journey.

  • Gregory Merena
    Reply

    The following is my caption for the share of this episode of your podcast:

    Integrity. Authenticity. Accuracy. The sheer Gold on the other side of vulnerability and honesty. Impact. World-view. Gratefulness for adolescent insights as a full adult. A compelling exhortation to BE that golden influence on others…..

    It’s all in there. I LOVE IT. It seems the more I listen to Antonia and Joel the deeper I come to appreciate their Vocation… and the greater the flashes of joy and insight and compelling drive I find to describe what Vocation truly is, not merely for myself, but for this generation and generations to come. The inspiration radiating out through tidal pools….

    This is beautiful.

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